Chicago gangs leaders

Chicago gangs leaders DEFAULT

Just what is the role of gangs in Chicago’s violence problem? A spate of shootings of young people in recent weeks has put a renewed spotlight on the issue.

The city has had gangs as long as it has been incorporated, but the structures have evolved over the years. As gangs were targeted by police and federal authorities using anti-racketeering laws from the 1970s onward, many gang leaders were incarcerated in federal prisons. That left behind a more fractured and anarchic gang culture, say gang experts.

“I don’t necessarily call them gangs because there is really no structure – they’re more like cliques and factions,” said Jervon Hicks, a former gang member who spent some 16 years in prison. Hicks now works as a life coach at the Youth Peace Center of Roseland mentoring and providing guidance to young men aged 18 to 26.

Hicks said that as he was drawn into gang life he developed an addiction to guns.

“There’s nothing to be held in your hand that’s more powerful than a firearm unless you have a large bank account and a large load of money,” says Hicks. The addiction came from seeing fear in other people’s eyes. Did I know I was doing wrong? Absolutely. Did I know it was illegal? Absolutely. But getting caught was far from my mind.”

He says that many young people in communities of color carry guns for their own protection rather than to perpetrate crime.

Benneth Lee is a former gang member who served some 15 years in Illinois prisons before turning his life around. Lee is now an instructor in criminal justice studies at Northeastern Illinois University and co-founder of the National Alliance for the Empowerment of the Formerly Incarcerated. He agrees that the gang structures that once existed are largely fragmented.

“You’ve got some guys that might be Vice Lords, but they don’t honor the Vice Lord Nation – they’re renegades,” said Lee. “You might see a group of guys on one block, there might be five Vice Lords, two Disciples and one Stone and they’re getting money together hustling and that’s how they’re moving now.”

Because of the fragmentation of gang structures and the loose affiliations that now exist between members, Lee says it’s hard to attribute criminal acts to particular gangs.

“Most young people get drawn into whatever’s happening in their community,” said Lee, and he noted that much of the violence that plagues many communities is not organized gang violence but simply a consequence of living in communities that have been deprived of investment for decades.

“This is not an organized effort by a street gang, this is just young people living in marginalized conditions reacting to the poverty of their circumstances.” Said Lee. “When it comes to the violence, this is not organized violence, these are individual, personal acts of violence.”

Miguel Cambray was born and raised in Little Village and is director of strategic partnerships and initiatives for READI Chicago at Heartland Alliance.

READI provides cognitive behavioral therapy which aims at disrupting impulsive, potentially criminal behaviors that can lead to gun violence.

Cambray said it has been able to engage over 700 individuals throughout four neighborhoods in Chicago.

“We work to build a sense community, a sense of purpose and self-worth,” said Cambray. “And that happens through relation building and it happens over time.”

Cambray said that it is “systems of oppression” that ultimately lead people to seek community in gangs.

“When you create systems of oppression and haves and have-nots, we all have to associate to something,” said Cambray.  “Your social network is defined by your social access. So something that you look at as a gang could be my family and my neighbors and I don’t see them that way.”


Sours: https://news.wttw.com/2021/04/21/fractured-chicago-gangs-lead-anarchic-culture-violence

Judge denies notorious Chicago gang leader sentencing break

Chicago judge denies sentencing break for notorious Gangster Disciples leader

A federal judge on Tuesday denied Gangster Disciples co-founder Larry Hoover's request for a sentencing break.

CHICAGO - Notorious Chicago gang leader Larry Hoover is staying behind bars for now.

A federal judge on Tuesday denied the Gangster Disciples co-founder's request for a sentencing break.

U.S. District Judge Harry Leinenweber called Hoover, "one of the most notorious criminals in Illinois history."

DOWNLOAD THE FOX 32 NEWS APP FOR BREAKING ALERTS

Just last year, Leinenweber seemed open to potentially letting the 70-year-old get a sentencing break, but in a rare move, U.S. Attorney John Lausch spoke out against it.

Federal prosecutors had said they believed they had proof Hoover was still in charge from behind prison walls.

A sweep of an associate's cell in 2015 uncovered a pocket dictionary with a coded message to the Gangster Disciples founder.

SIGN UP FOR EMAIL UPDATES FROM FOX 32 NEWS

"I am ready to handle your business," the message read.

Hoover is serving a 200-year sentence. He will have another chance to try for a sentencing break again.

Sours: https://www.fox32chicago.com/news/judge-denies-notorious-chicago-gang-leader-sentencing-break
  1. Printable maths quiz
  2. Walmart vga to displayport
  3. Sunday extracts reviews
  4. Target accent chairs

Imprisoned Gangster Disciples founder Larry Hoover, who says he’s no longer involved with the gang and is asking for an early release from his life sentence, promoted two men to top posts in the gang while locked up in a federal “super-max” prison in Colorado, according to an indictment unsealed Monday in East St. Louis.

The indictment says the two men threatened to kill anyone who challenged their authority and, on May 18, 2018, shot and killed a rival Gangster Disciples board member on the South Side of Chicago.

Hoover — who prosecutors have called “the most notorious gang leader in Chicago’s modern history” — isn’t charged in the indictment, which targets leaders of the Gangster Disciples in downstate Illinois and eastern Missouri in a racketeering case that includes two murders.

Hoover has asked a federal judge in Chicago to reduce his life sentence under a reform measure called the federal First Step Act, which allows people convicted of crack-cocaine offenses to challenge their sentences in light of subsequent changes in federal sentencing guidelines. Other high-ranking members of the gang have been released from prison under the same law.

But U.S. Attorney John Lausch urged U.S. District Judge Harry Leinenweber last year to keep Hoover in federal prison for the rest of his life. The judge hasn’t ruled.

If Leinenweber decides Hoover has served enough time in federal prison under the life term he was handed in 1997 for running a criminal enterprise, Hoover still faces a 200-year Illinois state court sentence from 1973 for ordering the killing of a gang member he suspected was stealing from him.

Hoover attorney Justin Moore said Tuesday he wasn’t aware of the new indictment and questioned the idea that Hoover could have been involved in gang affairs from behind bars.

“It seems almost impossible that he would be able to communicate that to anyone if he were trying to,” he said.

Moore questioned why prosecutors — who previously have said they suspected Hoover was still involved in the gang — hadn’t brought up the latest accusation during arguments over Hoover’s bid for a reduced sentence.

“This is a 70-year-old man in the twilight of his years who has serious medical complications and is seeking release to finally be with his wife, children and grandchildren after nearly 50 years of separation,” Moore said. “To have his name continuously thrown into the affairs of others and to be used as a scapegoat for criminal activity he has no connection to needs to cease.”

The new indictment says one member of the gang, Anthony Dobbins, told another, Warren “Big Head” Griffin, in September 2014 that Hoover had appointed them as “board members” — the highest rank in the gang’s leadership.

It also says Dobbins, 53, who’s from downstate Troy, a suburb of St. Louis, and Griffin, 51, from Lancaster, Kentucky, threatened to kill anyone who resisted their authority, though it doesn’t say how authorities got that information.

On May 18, 2018, Dobbins and Griffin shot and killed Earnest “Don Smokey” Wilson, 65, a rival Gangster Disciples board member, in the 7100 block of South Euclid Avenue in Chicago, according to the East St. Louis indictment.

Facebook

Dobbins and Griffin were arrested later in 2018, Dobbins for drug possession and Griffin in a separate case for illegal possession of a gun.

Dobbins is being held in the same prison where Hoover is being held, the federal super-max in Florence, Colorado, according to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons. Griffin is in a federal prison in Kentucky.

According to the Chicago police, the Gangster Disciples and other big Chicago gangs have, over the past two decades, fragmented into factions that aren’t controlled at the top the way they used to be. About 900 gang factions operate in Chicago today, police say. But recent indictments against Gangster Disciples members downstate and in Atlanta suggest that the corporate structure of the gang has remained in place.

U.S. District Court, Atlanta
Sours: https://chicago.suntimes.com/2021/1/26/22251228/gangster-disciples-larry-hoover-first-step-act-chicago-street-gang-new-indictment
Alleged Chicago gang leader among dozens arrested in federal gun, drug investigation

Chicago Black Disciples gang leader among 23 charged in federal investigation, officials say

CHICAGO (WLS) -- An alleged Chicago gang leader is among 23 individuals facing criminal charges as part of a federal investigation into drug and gun trafficking on the city's South Side.

The defendants were arrested Tuesday after a multi-year investigation, according to the Northern District of Illinois U.S. Attorney's Office.

The arrests come as federal authorities beef up their presence in Chicago to target violent crime.

"We're here to announce a big win the big win for our team and for the people of the Southside of Chicago," said Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown.

"The two dozen individuals that were arrested are arrested for serious crime. They promoted violence. They promoted drug activity," said Emerson Buie, Chicago FBI Special Agent in Charge

Among those arrested is Darnell McMiller, 34, of Chicago, also known as "Murder." McMiller is described in the charges as the current leader of the Black Disciples street gang in Chicago.

Several other alleged high-ranking members of the Black Disciples were also charged and arrested; including Clarence January, who allegedly leads the gang's "Dog Pound" factions; Kenneth Browns, who allegedly supplied the gang with drugs for distribution in Chicago; as well as Charles Knight, an alleged high-ranking member of the Gangster Disciples street gang, who is charged as part of the probe with supplying narcotics to McMiller's crew.

RELATED: President Trump sending 'hundreds' of federal agents to Chicago as part of anti-violence effort


Law enforcement also seized 24 firearms, more than 13 kilograms of cocaine, more than a kilogram of heroin, approximately 1,350 grams of heroin laced with fentanyl, approximately 750 grams of fentanyl or fentanyl analogue, approximately 378 grams of crack cocaine, $52,595 in suspected illicit cash proceeds, and distribution quantities of suspected MDMA pills.

Much of the alleged drug and gun trafficking occurred in the Englewood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, according to officials.

The FBI and Chicago Police Department led the investigation, with assistance from ATF, DEA, IRS Criminal Investigation Division, the Chicago High Intensity Drug Trafficking Task Force and the FBI Windy City Task Force. The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Wisconsin also contributed to the investigation after unsealing an eight-person indictment this week, charging heroin trafficking offenses related to the case.

WATCH: Police provide more details on federal investigation arrests


The Black Disciples are a national street gang that is prevalent throughout Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, the U.S. Attorney's Office says.

According to the charges, members of the Black Disciples have been distributing narcotics and guns in the Englewood neighborhood and other parts of Chicago. The charges describe more than 50 illicit transactions in which alleged Black Disciples members sold guns or drugs to individuals who were cooperating with law enforcement.

In many instances, the cooperating individuals surreptitiously video-recorded the transaction at the direction of law enforcement, officials say.

McMiller is accused of conspiring with Knight, 56, of Riverdale, to distribute fentanyl-laced heroin to a cooperating individual on Sept. 30, 2019, in the 7000-block of South Lowe Avenue, according to the complaint.

Brown, 59, of Chicago, is charged with conspiring with alleged Black Disciple member Terrence Morris, 48, of Chicago, to distribute heroin in March 2019. During the investigations, law enforcement says they carried out a court-authorized search of a South Side storage unit rented by Brown, where they found 13 kilograms of cocaine individually wrapped in sealed packages, the charges state.

RELATED: 3 men first to be charged as part of 'Operation Legend' in Chicago


January, 27, of Chicago, is accused of trafficking three handguns in the summer of 2019. He had previously been convicted in Cook County for a felony firearm offense and was not lawfully allowed to possess the guns. Several other convicted felons were also charged with unlawfully possessing firearms, including rifles and a shotgun furnished to members of the Black Disciples.

Others charged include Alonzo Brooks, 49, of Chicago; Shongo Collier, 48, of Riverdale; Lawrence Draus, 41, of Crestwood; Fredrick Stewart, 47, of Chicago; Tony Redding, 44, of Chicago; Ramont Austin, 39, of Chicago; Franklin Redding, 46, of Chicago; Barry Mckiel, 49, of Chicago; Brian Billups, 49, of Plainfield; Joseph Anderson, 43, of Chicago; Santana Steele, 36 of Chicago; Antoine McDaniels, 44, of Chicago; Deandre Martin, 32, of Chicago; Willie Alford, 45, of Chicago; Travis Washington, 24, of Chicago; Wendell Kemp, 55, of Chicago; Shawn Hudson, 48 of Harvey; and John Ector, 47, of Chicago.

The charges range from various drug and firearm offenses to bank fraud charges, according to law enforcement.

This operation is the kind authorities hope to do more of as part of "Operation Legend," the effort that is bringing more federal resources to Chicago.

RELATED: President Trump expands 'Operation Legend,' sending federal agents to Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland

"Operation Legend will not flood Chicago neighborhoods with uniformed agents and will not be used blindly to maximize the number of arrests. Rather, we will thoughtfully and strategically target violent offenders whose criminal behavior poses danger to the residents of Chicago," said Bob Bell, Chicago DEA Special Agent in Charge

US Attorney John Lausch says Operation Legend should lead to more announcements, but their success will not be measured in arrests, but by how much they can help reduce the shootings and murders in Chicago.
Sours: https://abc7chicago.com/chicago-crime-black-disciples-street-gang-drug-trafficking/6340729/

Leaders chicago gangs

Reputed leader of Black Disciples street gang among 23 arrested in federal drug takedown

The reputed leader of the Black Disciples street gang was among 23 people arrested in a federal gang takedown involving drug and weapons trafficking in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood, federal authorities announced Wednesday.

Darnell McMiller, 34, who goes by the street name “Murder,” was charged with distribution of fentanyl-laced heroin to a cooperating individual last September in the 7000 block of South Lowe Avenue, according to court records.

McMiller, of Chicago, is described in the charges as the current leader of the Black Disciples, a national street gang founded in the city in the 1960s. Also charged was Clarence January, who allegedly leads the gang’s “Dog Pound” faction, and Charles Knight, an alleged high-ranking member of the Gangster Disciples accused of supplying narcotics to McMiller’s crew.

McMiller’s arrest came a little more than a year after his release from federal prison on a separate narcotics conspiracy conviction. Records show he was sentenced to eight years behind bars in 2014 and released in mid-2019. Within weeks, he was captured on undercover FBI wiretaps attempting to arrange new drug pipelines for the gang, according to the charges.

In one recorded conversation from September 2019, McMiller told an undercover FBI informant that he was thinking of making the birthday of former Black Disciples leader Jerome “Shorty” Freeman a holiday for the gang “everywhere,” according to the criminal complaint unsealed after McMiller’s arrest.

McMiller told the informant that David Barksdale, who founded the original Black Gangster Disciples Nation along with Larry Hoover, is still “the king of kings,” but McMiller had more of a connection with Freeman, according to the charges.

“(Expletive) we know Shorty personally,” McMiller allegedly said.

Prosecutors alleged McMiller also talked about his role as a leader of the gang when it came to settling scores. At one point on the recordings, when the informant asked McMiller about a shooting the night before, McMiller replied, “Ah, they straightened that out,” the complaint alleged.

“Bro and ’nem from the 100s came and did that,” McMiller said, referencing the block in Black Disciples territory where his enforcers live. “They from the 100s.”

During a news conference outside Chicago police’s Englewood District station, law enforcement officials discussed the roundup, which including the seizure of heroin laced with the powerful painkiller fentanyl, as well as cocaine, ecstasy pills, two dozen guns and about $50,000.

U.S. Attorney John Lausch told reporters the multiyear probe was clearly active prior to the start of Operation Legend, an effort announced by the Trump administration last week calling for a surge in federal agents to Chicago to assist Chicago police and other law enforcement in tamping down violence.

But Lausch said the investigation represents the kind of work that law enforcement plans to emulate in Chicago during the new operation.

“The influx of federal resources under Operation Legend announced last week fits squarely within this same strategy and uses the same enforcement structure, including the agencies and the leaders that are up here today to help us rid our neighborhoods of gun-toters and drug traffickers in order (to) restore the rule of law and to help keep people safe,” said Lausch.

Emmerson Buie Jr., head of the Chicago FBI, said “today is an important day for me” since he grew up in the Englewood area where much of the investigation was centered. But he also pointed to other federal gang investigations that needed the FBI’s help.

“We’re not restricted to one area,” said Buie. “We are seeking out gun violence and criminals throughout the city to give everyone an opportunity to prosper and enjoy a beautiful city like Chicago.”

Meanwhile, Chicago police Superintendent David Brown, whose tenure has been marked by a jarring spike in gun violence, said the drug activity the Black Disciples allegedly engaged in directly affects the level of violence in Chicago.

“This is a big win for our team and for the people of the South Side (of) Chicago,” said Brown. “No one wants illegal drugs on their (block). No one. And no one wants to see drug dealers with guns in their neighborhoods.

“The gangs are fueled by the sale of illegal drugs, and drug dealing goes hand in hand with gun violence.”

Among the others swept up in the probe was John Ector, owner of the South Side nightclub V-75, who allegedly acted as the gang’s money man. Ector, 47, of Chicago, was charged with bank fraud, court records show.

Also arrested was Shongo Collier, part owner of the popular chicken restaurant Wings Around the World on West 61st Street. Collier, 48, of Riverdale, was charged with dealing fentanyl and other narcotics.

The two-year investigation also resulted in several alleged gang members charged with unlawfully trafficking handguns.

Several other previously convicted felons have been charged with unlawfully possessing firearms, including rifles and a shotgun furnished to members of the Black Disciples, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

Sours: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/criminal-justice/ct-chicago-black-disciples-drug-trafficking-probe-20200729-ubsapkcpijfa3fhkhpxgz42ua4-story.html
FBI-Chicago warns that gang cabal may be targeting police officers

Justice News

CHICAGO — The alleged leader of the Black Disciples street gang in Chicago is among 23 individuals facing criminal charges as part of a federal investigation into drug and gun trafficking on the city’s South Side.

During the multi-year investigation, law enforcement seized 24 firearms, more than 13 kilograms of cocaine, more than a kilogram of heroin, approximately 1,350 grams of heroin laced with fentanyl, approximately 750 grams of fentanyl or fentanyl analogue, approximately 378 grams of crack cocaine, $52,595 in suspected illicit cash proceeds, and distribution quantities of suspected MDMA pills.  Much of the alleged drug and gun trafficking occurred in the Englewood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago.

Indictments and criminal complaints unsealed this week in U.S. District Court in Chicago charge 22 of the defendants with various drug or firearm offenses, while one defendant faces bank fraud charges.  The defendants were arrested Tuesday and have begun making initial appearances in federal court.

Included among the defendants is DARNELL MCMILLER, also known as “Murder,” who is described in the charges as the current leader of the Black Disciples street gang in Chicago.  Several other alleged high-ranking members of the Black Disciples were also charged and arrested, including CLARENCE JANUARY, who allegedly leads the gang’s “Dog Pound” faction, and KENNETH BROWN, who allegedly supplied the gang with drugs for distribution in Chicago.  CHARLES KNIGHT, an alleged high-ranking member of the Gangster Disciples street gang, is charged as part of the probe with supplying narcotics to McMiller’s crew.

The investigation was led by the FBI and Chicago Police Department, with assistance from ATF, DEA, IRS Criminal Investigation Division, the Chicago High Intensity Drug Trafficking Task Force (HIDTA), and the FBI Windy City Task Force.

The charges and arrests were announced by John R. Lausch, Jr., United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Emmerson Buie, Jr., Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago office of the FBI; David Brown, Superintendent of CPD; Kristen deTineo, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Field Division of ATF; Robert J. Bell, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Field Division of the DEA; and Kathy A. Enstrom, Special Agent-in-Charge of IRS-CI in Chicago.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Andrew J. Dixon, Esther Mignanelli, Tobara Richardson, and Jasmina Vajzovic represent the government.

Valuable assistance in the probe was provided by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, which unsealed an eight-person indictment this week charging heroin trafficking offenses that are related to this investigation. 

The Black Disciples are a national street gang that is prevalent throughout Chicago and the surrounding suburbs.  According to the charges, members of the Black Disciples have been distributing narcotics and guns in the Englewood neighborhood and other parts of Chicago.  The charges describe more than 50 illicit transactions in which alleged Black Disciples members sold guns or drugs to individuals who were cooperating with law enforcement.  In many instances, the cooperating individuals surreptitiously video-recorded the transaction at the direction of law enforcement.

The complaint against McMiller, 34, of Chicago, accuses him of conspiring with Knight, 56, of Riverdale, to distribute fentanyl-laced heroin to a cooperating individual on Sept. 30, 2019.  The transaction occurred in the 7000 block of South Lowe Avenue in Chicago, the complaint states.

Brown, 59, of Chicago, is charged with conspiring with alleged Black Disciple member TERRENCE MORRIS, 48, of Chicago, to distribute heroin in March 2019.  During the investigation, law enforcement carried out a court-authorized search of a South Side storage unit rented by Brown and discovered 13 kilograms of cocaine, which were individually wrapped in sealed packages, the charges state. 

January, 27, of Chicago, is accused of trafficking three handguns in the summer of 2019.  He had previously been convicted of a felony firearm offense in the Circuit Court of Cook County and was not lawfully allowed to possess the guns.  Several other convicted felons were also charged with unlawfully possessing firearms, including rifles and a shotgun furnished to members of the Black Disciples.

Charged with federal drug offenses are: McMiller; Knight; Brown; Morris; ALONZO BROOKS, 49, of Chicago; SHONGO COLLIER, 48, of Riverdale; LAWRENCE DRAUS, 41, of Crestwood; FREDRICK STEWART, 47, of Chicago; TONY REDDING, 44, of Chicago; RAMONT AUSTIN, 39, of Chicago; FRANKLIN REDDING, 46, of Chicago; BARRY MICKIEL, 49, of Chicago; BRIAN BILLUPS, 40, of Plainfield; JOSEPH ANDERSON, 43, of Chicago; and SANTANA STEELE, 36, of Chicago.

Charged with federal firearm offenses are January; ANTOINE MCDANIELS, 44, of Chicago; DEANDRE MARTIN, 32, of Chicago; WILLIE ALFORD, 45, of Chicago; TRAVIS WASHINGTON, 24, of Chicago; WENDALL KEMP, 55, of Chicago; and SHAWN HUDSON, 48, of Harvey.

Charged with bank fraud is JOHN ECTOR, 47, of Chicago.

The public is reminded that charges contain only accusations and are not evidence of guilt.  The defendants are presumed innocent and entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.  If convicted, the Court must impose reasonable sentences under federal sentencing statutes and the advisory U.S. Sentencing Guidelines.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office holds gun offenders accountable through Project Guardian and Project Safe Neighborhoods – the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction strategies.  The U.S. Attorney’s Office has deployed the Guardian and PSN programs to attack a broad range of violent crime issues facing the district, including by prosecuting individuals who illegally possess firearms.  Additional federal law enforcement resources were recently allocated to Chicago under Operation Legend, which will enhance existing efforts by federal law enforcement agencies working in conjunction with state and local law enforcement offices to fight violent crime.

Sours: https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndil/pr/alleged-chicago-gang-leader-among-23-defendants-charged-federal-drug-and-gun

Now discussing:

Gangs in Chicago

Chicago is considered the most gang-affiliated city in the United States, with a population ranging from 100,000 active members from 57 gangs[1] to 70 gangs with more than 150,000 members.[2]Gang warfare and retaliation is common in Chicago. Gangs were responsible for 61% of the homicides in Chicago in 2011.

Causes[edit]

Former Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy blames Chicago's gang culture for its high rates of homicide and other violent crime, stating "It's very frustrating to know that it's like 7% of the population causes 80% of the violent crime...The gangs here are traditional gangs that are generational, if you will. The grandfather was a gang member, the father's a gang member, and the kid right now is going to be a gang member.[3]

Policing strategy[edit]

Mayor Rahm Emanuel disbanded the Chicago Police Department's anti-gang unit in 2012 in order to focus on beat patrols, which he said would have a more long-term solution to violence than anti-gang units.[4][5]

Population[edit]

As many as 57 active Chicago street gangs with 747 factions have been identified.[6][7] Some of the gangs that contribute most of the crime on the streets of Chicago:

History[edit]

Detailed analysis of the homicides timeline by month show that homicides (of black) went up right after Martin Luther King Jr. was killed in 1968. Hispanic-on-Hispanic homicides were alleged not to have increased until the summer of 1971 due to the Latin Kings gang election meetings.[8] In July 2020, federal agents participating in Operation Legend arrested 23 Black Disciples gang members associated with drugs and gun violations in the Englewood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Chicago Gang Violence: By The Numbers". Abcnews.go.com. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  2. ^"Chicago Most Gang-Infested City in U.S., Officials Say". NBC Chicago. January 26, 2012. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  3. ^"Gangs and guns fuel Chicago's summer surge of violence | PBS NewsHour". Pbs.org. July 20, 2015. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  4. ^"Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is defending his decision in the first days of his administration to disband anti-gang units like the Mobile Strike Force | WBEZ 91.5 Chicago". Wbez.org. July 9, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  5. ^"Terrorised Chicago residents plead for police crackdown as gang war murders soar". Telegraph. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  6. ^"Chicago Street Gangs". Chicago Gang History. Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  7. ^"Gang Areas in Chicago". Uic.edu. Archived from the original on March 1, 2016. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  8. ^"Latin Kings 1971-72 Election Meetings". Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  9. ^CHICAGO BLACK DISCIPLES GANG LEADER AMONG 23 CHARGED IN FEDERAL INVESTIGATION, OFFICIALS SAYABC7 Chicago, July 29, 2020
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangs_in_Chicago


241 242 243 244 245