Guitar cabinet wiring diagram

Guitar cabinet wiring diagram DEFAULT

How to properly wire a 4x12 speaker cabinet

How to properly wire a 4x12 speaker cabinet

So, this week I received an email from Scott, a WGS aficionado who was inquiring as to how he should wire his Marshall-style cabinet.  To be honest, I hadn’t given that one any thought in a couple of decades, and it made me think.  In essence, there are two ways to wire up a 4 speaker cabinet that both wind up with the cabinet having the same impedance as any one of the individual drivers, or in other words, a cabinet with four 8-ohm speakers that ends up with a total cabinet impedance of 8-ohms.

The two main methods of arriving at this means are as follows:

 

Okay, so let’s talk about the difference between the two.

Here is my reply to Scott, which I will … until proven wrong … stick by:

I opened up a couple of my vintage Marshall cabs (a and a ), and both are wired "series/parallel".  I really like these cabs, and so I think I’d go with that.  Plus, if you do it in the "parallel/series" style and one speaker fails with a full open voice coil, all four speakers will be down, and your amp will see a no-load impedance.  I know this is unlikely with your ultra low-power amp, but I’d still term it a "consideration".

Scott replied that a fellow by the name of Jim at an amp shop in his area felt as though "the parallel-series method provides a darker tone".  Hummm I had not heard that before, and I have not been able to substantiate it.  So, I’ll stick by my suggestion to go with the "vintage" Marshall series-parallel wiring method when wiring a 4-speaker cabinet.   However, I am always ready to hear another point of view.  If you have any experience or input in this, email me, and I’ll be sure to share the information on this blog! Oh, and as for the modern Marshall mono-stereo switch, well, let’s just say no to that little bit of absurdity (please)!

Until next week    -Vaughn-

**UPDATE**: Scott has just checked in; he tried the wiring both ways, and could discern no difference in tone - that's kinda what I would have suspected.  He went with the series-parallel method for the reasons I described above.  Here is a pic of the wiring in his Marshall cab, with the new WGS Green Berets installed.  Looks like a good clean wiring job!

email vaughn

About Vaughn

Sours: https://wgsusa.com/how-properly-wire-4xspeaker-cabinet

Celestion Loudspeakers

Replacing a speaker or speakers in your cab can be a really cost-effective way of significantly upgrading your tone. If you&#;re thinking of swapping out speakers yourself, then you&#;ve come to the right place! It needn&#;t be a difficult operation, but it&#;s important to be aware of how the speakers are connected up, as well as some of the implications of wiring up multiple speakers together. Before you get to re-loading your cab.. take a moment to read through the important background information below and get ready to take a step closer to great tone!

Single Speaker

The most basic cabinet configuration is a single speaker.

1 x 8 ohm Speaker = 8 ohm load
1&#;16 ohm speaker = 16 ohm load

Two Speakers

Remember:
1. Match impedances (ohms) &#; all speakers in the same box should have the same impedance.

2. Power handling &#; as a rule of thumb, when mixing speaker types in a two speaker cabinet, maximum power handling is 2 x the lowest rated speaker (e.g. for watt & watt speakers, max power handling = 2&#;watt = watt)

There are two ways you can wire a two speaker cabinet.

 

Series: 2 x 4 Ohm Speaker = 8 Ohm Load;

2 X 8 Ohm Speaker = 16 Ohm Load;

2 X 16 Ohm Speaker = 32 Ohm Load

 

Or, in Parallel: 2 X 4 Ohm Speaker = 2 Ohm Load;

2 X 8 Ohm Speaker = 4 Ohm Load;

2 X 16 Ohm Speaker = 8 Ohm Load

Four Speakers

Remember:
1. Match impedances (ohms) &#; all speakers in the same box should have the same impedance

2. Power handling &#; as a rule of thumb, when mixing speakers in a four speaker cabinet, maximum power is 4 x the lowest rated speaker (e.g. for 2&#;watt & 2&#;watt speakers, max power handling = 4&#;watt = watt)

There are two ways you can wire a 4&#;12 (or 4&#;10 for that matter), the main one is Series/Parallel: 4 X 8 Ohm Speaker = 8 Ohm Load; 4 X 16 Ohm Speaker = 16 Ohm Load

Sours: https://celestion.com/blog/speaker-wiring-configurations/
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Welcome back, everyone!  This week on Make It Monday, we are going to go over how to wire up a 1x12 and 2x12 extension cabinet wiring harness.  This is a straightforward and simple project that will get you soldering, clipping wires, crimping terminals, and wiring up your own cabinets. 



Tools and Supplies


Before we dive in, let's go over the tools and supplies we will be working with today (Refer to Image 1A below).  We are using a Switchcraft J11 mono output jack, so we need one of those.  Next, we will need 2 or 3 feet of both black and white 18AWG stranded cloth covered wire (length will depend on your cabinet and how many speakers you are wiring up).  We highly recommend buying or borrowing a crimper or "crimping shrugs" to crimp down 1/4" female terminal fast-ons to the end of your wire -- this will make future speaker swaps much easier on you, where hard soldering to the speaker terminals will prove to be a much more frustrating connection in the end.  

After that, we need a set of wire cutters, a soldering iron and holder, and some solder.  


 


Step 1: Soldering the J11 Jack


Before anything else, let's make sure we have our cloth covered wire cut to the appropriate length.  To do this, run the black wire with your hands from the jack ferrule on the cabinet's backpanel, to the metal terminal on the speaker itself.  Now give an extra inch of slack, and cut the wire.  Repeat this step with the white wire.  Note: This will also depend on how many speakers are going into your cabinet and how they are being wired -- refer to Step 3: Wiring The Cabinet for more information.

Next, take a look at your J11 jack, you should notice two solder terminals; one is positive and the other is ground.  The ground terminal will be slightly inset and is connected to the metal sleeve that goes into the jack.  The positive terminal is the terminal that is all the way on the outer rim of the jack and is not connected to the metal sleeve (See Image 2A).  


 


We are going to start by wiring the black wire to the ground terminal on the jack.  To do this, get your jack in a stable position on your workbench, push back the cloth covering, twist the stranded wire together, and push it through the hole in the terminal (Image 3A).  Now that the wire will stay still on its own, you can solder the wire to the terminal.  You will likely have some excess wire hanging off of your connection, use your wire cutters to trim this excess (Image 3B).  Repeat the above with the white wire on the positive terminal of the jack.


 


Step 2: Applying 1/4" Female Fast-Ons

Now that we have the jack takern care of, we need to handle the other end of our wires.  Applying 1/4" female fast-ons will make for an easy and secure connection when it comes time to attach the harness to the speaker.  To do this, we need (2) of our fast-ons and our crimper.  

Here again, we need to push back the cloth covering on our black wire and lightly twist the wire.  Then, push the wire through the opening in the bottom of the fast-on (Image 4A), and then use the crimper to secure the fast-on to the wire (Image 4B).  Repeat this step for the white wire.


 



Step 3: Wiring The Cabinet

As I said in the beginning, we will be going wiring for both 1x12 and 2x12 extension cabinets.  Starting with a simple 1x12, we need to make sure that our speaker impedance matches our amplifier impedance.  Once this is confirmed, we will connect the white wire to the terminal on our speaker labeled with the plus symbol (+).  To do this, simply slide the female fast on over the corresponding speaker terminal -- you may have to wiggle it back and forth a bit to get it all the way on (See Images 5A and 5B).  Repeat this step for the ground/black wire on the speaker terminal labeled with the minues sign (-).  Note: Many speakers will not have the minus (-) sign on the ground terminal, but will instead be blank.  If this is the case with your speaker, just know the positive wire connects to the terminal labeled with the plus (+) sign and the ground wire connects to the unlabeled terminal. 




 


Lastly, all we have to do is secure the jack to the jack ferrule on the cabinet's backpanel.  To do this, remove the nut and washer from the jack, insert the threaded end of the jack through the ferrule, slide the washer back over the threads, and screw down the nut (See Image 6A and 6B). 


 


If you're a 1x12 cabinet kind of guy, you're all done!  However, if you are a 2x12 cabinet kind of guy, we need to go a bit further.  First, we need to determine the overall desired impedance of our circuit.  Let's say our amplifier is 8ohms.  We have two options:

Option 1 - (2) 16ohm speakers wired in parallel
Option 2 - (2) 4ohm speakers wired in series

In this case, we are going to use (2) 16ohm speakers wired in parallel for an overall 8ohm load (see speaker wiring diagrams at the end of article to determine best wiring configuration for your rig).  

Wiring in parallel requires you to run from the positive and ground terminals on your jack, to the positive and ground terminals on the first speaker.  From there, you will connect an additional set of wires from the positive and ground terminals on your first speaker, to the positive and ground terminals on your second speaker.  So, we need to prep another set of wires.  This time, we are going to apply 1/4" female fast-ons to both ends of each wire, but before we do that, we need to measure from the terminals on the first speaker to the terminals on the second speaker to determine how much wire we need (refer back to Step 2 if needed).  Once this is done, we need to push back the cloth covering on our wires, and attach the fast-ons (again, refer back to Step 2 if needed).  If desired, twist the wires together for a clean look (See Image 7A).


 


Finally, we will connected the positive and ground wires to the corresponding speaker terminals on speaker one, and then on speaker two (See Image 8A).


 


Last but certainly not least, connect this bad boy to your amp and listen to it scream!  Please take a look at the speaker wiring diagrams below to explore more ways to wire up your cabinet.  This will prove helpful when working with amps and speakers of varying impedances, and you will notice that there is almost always more than one way to wire a cabinet.  Thanks again for tuning in to this week's Make It Monday -- see you next time!



  
Sours: https://www.mojotone.com/blog/mim-building-a-speaker-wiring-harness
DIY: How to Install Speakers in a 4x12 Cab, Part 1

Wiring a 2 X 12 Speaker cabinet

Shavano Music Online
2/04 - Jens Moller http://www.colomar.com/Shavano/2x12wiring.html
Note: For 4 speaker solutions see: Wiring a 4 X 12 Speaker cabinet

This Web page contains a lot of information that may be new to you. You may need to find someone who is knowledgeable about reading electronic schematics to help understand what some of this information is telling you.


Many people have asked how to wire up a 2 speaker Cabinet that can have an extension speaker cabinet (usually another 2 speaker Cabinet) plugged into it when desired. The most common request I get is for 2 speakers that are 12 inch in diameter (2 X 12), however, this solution pertains to 2 10's, 2 15's or any mix of sizes. Please try to make sure that each speaker is approximately the same SPL (see SPL Discussion for more information on this topic). In this set of wiring diagrams, all speakers in the same cabinet are the same impedance.

Voice Coil Tweeters, if used, may not be the same impedance, it depends on how they are used.

Piezos do not have impedance that affects the other speakers in the cabinet.

For other speaker combinations, please see: Speaker Wiring/Loading Examples and under Speakers - Usage/Wiring on the Construction Web Page.

Connector Choices

Many people install both 1/4 inch phone jacks and Speakons on the same cabinet. This allows you plug your cabinet on no matter which is in use.

1/4 inch phone jacks cannot reliably support more than watts of power. If your cabinet will be used at watts or higher, use Speakon connectors instead.

Which connector is right for you?

Most Guitar and Keyboard amplifiers use 1/4 inch phone jacks for thier Speaker connections.

Some higher powered Bass Guitar amplifiers will use Speakon connectors.

Most Low to Mid power PA systems use 1/4 inch jacks and bananna plugs for thier Speaker connections, some occasionally include Speakons.

Many high powered PA systems only provide Bananna connectors or Speakons

Internal Wire

If your speakers will see watts or less, use 18 or 16 gauge (AWG) wire.

If your speakers will see watts or above, use 16, 14 or 12 gauge (AWG) wire.

Piezos and Voice-Coil tweeters do not use as much power since they are frequency limited. 20 or 18 gauge (AWG) wire is sufficent.

NOTE: Wire is available a hardware stores and auto parts stores. Use stranded copper wire. Solder all internal connections to components.

Cabinet Wiring Options

Wiring Diagram
Usage Information

Mono

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Hard wired for a single total impedance.

Option 1

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 ohms

Option 2

2 - 16 ohm speakers = 8 ohms

Mono

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Hard wired for a single total impedance.

Option 1

2 - 4 ohm speakers = 8 ohms

Option 2

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 16 ohms

    Note:The power rating of a Piezo should be at least 1/2 of power rating of the regular speakers.

Mono with Piezo Tweeter

2 Musical Intrument Speakers and 1 Piezo. Hard wired for a single total impedance.

Option 1

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 ohms

Option 2

2 - 16 ohm speakers = 8 ohms
    Note:The power rating of a voice coil tweeter should be at least 1/4 of power rating of the regular speakers.

    See First Order Cross-overs for other capacitor frequency ranges.

    Note:As long as the voice coil tweeter's cross-over is Hz or above, you do not need a Low Pass inductor for the Woofers.

Mono with Voice Coil Tweeter

2 Musical Intrument Speakers and 1 Voice Coil Tweeter. Hard wired for a single total impedance.

Option 1

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 ohms
1 - 4 ohm tweeter, 10 uf capacitor for Hz

Option 2

2 - 16 ohm speakers = 8 ohms
1 - 8 ohm tweeter, 5 uf capacitor for Hz
    Note:The power rating of a Piezo should be at least 1/2 of power rating of the regular speakers.

Mono with Piezo Tweeter

2 Musical Intrument Speakers and 1 Piezo. Hard wired for a single total impedance

Option 1

2 - 4 ohm speakers = 8 ohms

Option 2

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 16 ohms
    Note:The power rating of a voice coil tweeter should be at least 1/4 of power rating of the regular speakers.

    See First Order Cross-overs for other capacitor frequency ranges.

    Note:As long as the voice coil tweeter's cross-over is Hz or above, you do not need a Low Pass inductor for the Woofers.

Mono with Voice Coil Tweeter

2 Musical Intrument Speakers and 1 Voice Coil Tweeter. Hard wired for a single total impedance.

Option 1

2 - 4 ohm speakers = 8 ohms
1 - 8 ohm tweeter, 5 uf capacitor for Hz

Option 2

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 16 ohms
1 - 16 ohm tweeter, uf capacitor for Hz
    Mouser Electronics Sells 1/4 inch phone jacks that have a built in DPDT switch. - Marshall used this type of Jack/Switch to automatically set the speaker selection mode. They are expensive and prone to failure over time, however, using them often simplifies set-up of your rig. If you decide to use these, it is reccomended that you use a seperate Jack for each impedance and that the switch function depends on which jack you plug into.

Mono, Switchable Impedance

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Impedance selectable between 4 and 16 ohms by using a switch.

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 or 16 ohms depending on which way the switch is set

No other impedance speaker is reccomended for this configuration.

WARNING: Do not flip the switch while the power amp is powered up

    Mouser Electronics Sells 1/4 inch phone jacks that have a built in DPDT switch. - Marshall used this type of Jack/Switch to automatically set the speaker selection mode. They are expensive and prone to failure over time, however, using them often simplifies set-up of your rig. If you decide to use these, it is reccomended that you use a seperate Jack for each impedance and that the switch function depends on which jack you plug into.

    A Piezo is not dependant on impedance in the ranges that we are operating at. Because of this, as single Piezo can be used for both impedance settings.

    Note:The power rating of a Piezo should be at least 1/2 of power rating of the regular speakers.

Mono, Switchable Impedance with Piezo

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Impedance selectable between 4 and 16 ohms by using a switch.

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 or 16 ohms depending on which way the switch is set

No other impedance speaker is reccomended for this configuration.

WARNING: Do not flip the switch while the power amp is powered up

    Mouser Electronics Sells 1/4 inch phone jacks that have a built in DPDT switch. - Marshall used this type of Jack/Switch to automatically set the speaker selection mode. They are expensive and prone to failure over time, however, using them often simplifies set-up of your rig. If you decide to use these, it is reccomended that you use a seperate Jack for each impedance and that the switch function depends on which jack you plug into.

    Note:The power rating of a voice coil tweeter should be at least 1/4 of power rating of the regular speakers.

    See First Order Cross-overs for other capacitor frequency ranges.

    Note:As long as the voice coil tweeter's cross-over is Hz or above, you do not need a Low Pass inductor for the Woofers.

    NOTE:You must use a seperate Voice Coil tweeter per Woofer - the Cross-Over capacitor is based on impedance, you cannot switch load impedance without using a different capacitor (the cross-over frequency will move) - If run individually, switching impedances will not alter the cross-over frequency.

Mono, Switchable Impedance with 2 Voice Coil Tweeters

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Impedance selectable between 4 and 16 ohms by using a switch.

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 4 or 16 ohms depending on which way the switch is set

2 - 8 ohm tweeters, 5 uf capacitor for Hz

No other impedance speaker is reccomended for this configuration.

WARNING: Do not flip the switch while the power amp is powered up

    The Right channel jack is completely disconnected when in Mono Mode. Do Not alter this configuration (you risk doing serious damage to your power amps if wired differently).

    Mouser Electronics Sells 1/4 inch phone jacks that have a built in DPDT switch - the switch contacts are electrically isolated from the 1/4 inch Jack connection (they have to be in order for you to wire this correctly) - Marshall used this type of Jack/Switch to automatically set the speaker selection mode. They are expensive and prone to failure over time, however, using them often simplifies set-up of your rig. If you decide to use these, the Mono/Stereo switch functionality would be associated with the Right channel, where when nothing is plugged into the Right channel, the cabinet is operating in Mono Mode.

    WARNING: Never run a Tube Type power amp to the Right channel if the switch is set to Mono mode - it will damage the output transformer.

    NOTE: If you want Tweeters or Piezos in this configuration, you will need 2 of them, 1 per Woofer. This is because the speakers can be operated as seperate channels, using 2 completely different power amplifiers. The Tweeters or Piezos will be wired in parallel with the Woofers. The same arrangement as the above Dual Impedance systems.

    WARNING: The Left and Right jacks cannot be mounted on the same metal plate (serious damage to some power amps will occur if you do this). Use a seperate jack plate for each channel, mounted on a non-conductive surface

Mono/Stereo in same cabinet using DPDT switch

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Selectable between Stereo/Mono by using a switch.

4 ohm impedance speakers are not reccomended for this configuration.

Option 1

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 8 ohms to each channel if run in Stereo, 4 ohms in Mono mode.

Option 2

2 - 16 ohm speakers = 16 ohms to each channel if run in Stereo, 8 ohms in Mono mode.

Option 3

In case you have 2 - 4 ohm speakers, and want mono mode to be 8 ohms. You have to wire the switch differently - link goes to new schematic.

WARNING: Do not flip the switch while power amp(s) is(are) powered up

WARNING: The Left and Right jacks cannot be mounted on the same metal plate (serious damage to some power amps will occur if you do this). Use a seperate jack plate for each channel, mounted on a non-conductive surface

Mono/Stereo in same cabinet using Switchcraft 14B Stereo Jacks

2 Musical Intrument Speakers. Selectable between Stereo/Mono by connecting a cable to the Stereo Jack.

4 ohm impedance speakers are not reccomended for this configuration.

Option 1

2 - 8 ohm speakers = 8 ohms to each channel if run in Stereo, 4 ohms in Mono mode.

Option 2

2 - 16 ohm speakers = 16 ohms to each channel if run in Stereo, 8 ohms in Mono mode.

Personally, I prefer external mounted DPDT switches over the 1/4 inch Jacks that have built in DPDT switches. Part of this is because I use cabinets that have Speakon Connectors as well as 1/4 inch jacks, and there is no way to automate the switching with a Speakon connector. Another reason is that the switched jacks are not that reliable over time. Many of my cabinets are 20 years old and get used frequently - all switches malfunction over time and switched jacks are hard to find if you suddenly need to replace one (buy spares if you decide to use them).

NOTE: For all DPDT switches shown - I suggest 5 Amp (or higher), V rating

Example of translating a DPDT Jack to/from DPDT Switch (Your Switched Jack may be different)

NOTE: The Ring Connection would be left open for all examples shown above

A regular DPDT switch will not include NO and NC markings - this is because either position is its normal state. The Switched jack, however, is a momentary contact switch, as as such, when nothing is plugged into it, the NC positions are what it is set to. When you plug a cable into it, the NO positions are what it is set to. Use this logic to figure out what mode you want the Default switch configuration (ie. when nothing is plugged into the jack) when you wire up the jack to the speakers. The NO and NC markings are on the drawing to give you an better cross-reference perspective.

Be aware that if you use a stereo mode switching jack along with a regular mono phone plug, you have to push the plug in all the way (as you will feel the first detent - about 1/4 of an inch (approx 6 mm) before the jack is plugged in all the way) in order for both the switched connections to end up properly switched.

Note: If you do not know how to read schematic diagrams for switches and jacks, please try to find someone who does, to assist in this effort.

Using 2 cabinets with a Power Amp

Speaker cables:
  • Unshielded, stranded copper wire
  • 18 gauge (AWG) or thicker (the lower the gauge number, the thicker it is)

Cable Connections
Usage Information
Connecting Speakers in Parallel

    Stereo is simply wired up as 2 seperate Mono channels.
If your Power amp can drive a 2 ohm load
  • 2 - 4 ohm cabinets = 2 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 8 ohm cabinet = ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = ohms
  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 4 ohms
  • 1 - 8 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = ohms
  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 8 ohms

If your Power amp can drive a 4 ohm load

  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 4 ohms
  • 1 - 8 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet =
  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 8 ohms

If your Power amp can drive an 8 ohm load

  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 8 ohms
If your Power amp can drive a 4 ohm load
  • 2 - 2 ohm cabinets = 4 ohms
  • 2 - 4 ohm cabinets = 8 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 8 ohm cabinet = 12 ohms
  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 16 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = 20 ohms
  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 16 ohms
  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 32 ohms

If your Power amp can drive an 8 ohm load

  • 2 - 4 ohm cabinets = 8 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 8 ohm cabinet = 12 ohms
  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 16 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = 20 ohms
  • 1 - 8 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = 24 ohms
  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 32 ohms

If your Power amp can drive a 16 ohm load

  • 2 - 8 ohm cabinets = 16 ohms
  • 1 - 4 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = 20 ohms
  • 1 - 8 ohm and 1 - 16 ohm cabinet = 24 ohms
  • 2 - 16 ohm cabinets = 32 ohms
For 1/4 inch (and 1/8 inch) phone jacks, you need to verify which solder tabs go to the + and - connections, 1/4 (and 1/8) inch phone jacks have no standard for which of the solder tabs goes to what. Open cased Jacks are easy to verify - just look at it. In an enclosed Jack, you may need to use a VOM/Digital Multimeter to check which connection goes to what.

The + and - relate to how the speakers are connected. The speaker should have a colored dot on it to indicate + or it will be marked with a +.

Speakons are relatively new to the Audio scene. They were designed to provide a safe and easy to use High Power Speaker/Power Amp connection system. Some models also allow you to connect more than one set of speakers (the most commonly found model, the NL4 series, has 2 sets of connections in it).

The main speakers are typically wired to the 1 connections, and the secondary (if used at all) are connected to the 2 connections. Each set has a + and a -. The + corresponds to the Center Tap (which should be the + connections of the speakers), and the - corresponds to the Signal Ground/Case.

Other models of the Speakons exist that have more or fewer connections than the NL4 series.

NOTE: Steve Dallman writes

Piezo tweeters are seen by the power amp as a capacitor. Some power amps (such as Kustom) can't handle a capacitive load. When that happens, the amp goes into thermal runaway and it can take the amp out.

To remedy this, simply add a resistor in series with the piezo. The resistor can be anywhere from 2 to 20 ohms and I'd suggest using at least 5 watts handling. I generally use an 8 ohm/20watt from Radio Shack.

The resistor will not change the response of the piezo, and it will help protect the piezo from burnout as well.


NOTE: We do not work on Home or Car Audio. We work only with Pro-Audio applications. We cannot help you with Home or Car Audio questions.

Questions? Comments? .

Return to Shavano Music Online Home page

� - Shavano Music Online

Sours: http://www.colomar.com/Shavano/2x12wiring.html

Wiring diagram cabinet guitar

This page provides links to downloadable wiring diagrams for the various Sound City speaker cabinets you might own. These are admittedly crude examples (I'm no artist), but they are accurate. Also, these diagrams can be used with any cabs that have two or four of any size speaker (10s, 12s, 15s, etc.).

  • Here is a link to a page that describes speaker wiring generically and mathematically (with equations).
  • Here is a link to a Sound City site page that discusses measuring what's called DC resistance (Re), from which you can determine and extrapolate the nominal impedance of a speaker or speaker cabinet, and
  • Here is a link to an impedance calculator that works very well (courtesy of Sadowsky Audio and Sadowsky Guitars, Ltd.).

Please note that all the following linked files are in PDF format, which requires Adobe Acrobat Reader be installed on your computer. (Click here to download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader if you need it.)

spacerPlease Note: The L wiring diagram above shows six ohm speakers, but at least one L cab I've seen has had six 8-ohm speakers; therefore, the same equation shown in the wiring diagram can be used, but the combined DC resistance (Re) would yield a measured ohms; therefore, the cab's nominal impedance would be 8 ohms.spacerPlease Note: As you view the following two wiring diagrams, please realize there is much discussion about what series-parallel wiring looks like versus what parallel-series wiring looks like. I believe this is a semantics issue more than anything because electrically, these two methods are the same. Also, many people feel they can hear differences between the two; I'm not one of these people. So, if my parallel-series wiring diagram looks like someone else's series-parallel diagram, so be it. I think it's just semantics. But I've been wrong before! spacer
  • Wiring Two Cabs in Series
    This wiring scheme can be used for any two cabs as long as A) they each have the same nominal impedance (2, 4, or 8 ohms each) and B) their combined nominal impedance isn't greater than 16 ohms when connected in series.
What's "Parallel-Series-Parallel" you ask?

I know this is a Sound City site, but some bass players might be using their SC heads with these very popular 8x10 Ampeg cabs, which have two sets of four inch speakers in them. If you use one of these cabs, here's a way to rewire each set of four ohm 10s in parallel-series so that when you use the two sets of four 10s together (in mono, i.e., in parallel) your SC amp sees an optimum ohm load.

Hence, my use of the term Parallel-Series-Parallel. For what this might be worth
Sours: http://soundcitysite.com/wire_diags.htm
Speaker Wiring for guitar cabs - Series Vs Parallel (Including Audio Examples)

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