Borinquen significado

Borinquen significado DEFAULT

Are you about to head to Puerto Rico and want to learn some Puerto Rican slangs to help you speak like a native?

If you have spent time in Spanish speaking countries or even if you have talked to Spanish-speaking friends, you know that the vocabulary can vary widely between countries.

Everyday words in one country may be vulgar curse words in another.

For instance, the word “coger” has a drastically different significance in Mexico than it does in Spain.

You aren’t catching a taxi when you say that in Mexico. 🙂

useful spanish phrases for travel

Learning local expressions and vocabulary not only helped me understand my Spanish friends better, but also helped me feel more integrated into Spanish society.

Whenever you go to a new country, it is helpful to learn some words in the native language.

Puerto Rican Cemetery

Even if you are a Spanish speaker, you can benefit by learning local expressions before traveling to a new country.

In this article, I walk through 10 Puerto Rican Spanish slang words and expressions. Since Puerto Rico is an American territory, many of its slang expressions have English language influences.

10 Puerto Rican Slang Words to Learn

Best Spanish Phrases for Travel

1. Boricua

Boricua is the local name for a Puerto Rican. The word derives from the indigenous name for the island of Puerto Rico: Boriken or Boriquín.

The Boricuas first inhabited the island many, many years ago long before the Spanish came and conquered. The name signifies, “Brave and noble Lord”.

So, next time you see a Puerto Rican, make sure to say, “Que tal, Boricua”. It might catch them by surprise.

2. Tirar

In addition to the traditional meaning of tirar, “to throw away”, in Puerto Rican slang, tirar also means to make fun of someone.

The noun derived from the verb form, tiradera or tiraera means a dis or verbal feud and often refers to feuds between rappers.

3. Al garete

Al garete is used to refer to someone or something that is adrift or going poorly.

It has a nautical origin. The garete is the rudder that is used as a last resort when a ship finds itself without a mast or oars, and al garete originally referred to a ship that was adrift.

You can say that something “se fue al garete”, meaning it started to go disastrously, such as “el partido se fue al garete” (the game went poorly).

You can also tell some “vete al garete” or “get lost” if they are bugging you. Careful with whom you use this one though, as context is key.

4. Chavos

Puerto Rican money

Chavos is a Puerto Rican slang word for money.

It is derived from a contraction of ochavo in old Spanish, or one-eighth, which in turn refers to the eight pieces a silver coin was divided into in previous centuries.

Before you head off for Puerto Rico, make sure you bring along some chavos.

5. Bregar

Bregar means to struggle or to work on something with a lot of effort.

In Puerto Rican slang, both “bregaste Chicky Starr” and “bregar cajita de pollo” mean to betray someone or play dirty.

Chicky Starr was a Puerto Rican wrestler who takes on the antagonist. La cajita de pollo (box of chicken) refers to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s box of soggy chicken pieces that were not worth the money, at least originally.

As you can imagine this one is a bit of a silly phrase, but it is another way of saying, “you did me wrong”.

6. Wepa

Puerto Rico Slang

Wepa is more an exclamation than a word.

It is yelled to express joy and utter happiness. Puerto Ricans will yell it nasally and hold the “e” and “a” for a long time.

This may be used to celebrate a victory, a birthday or a good exam grade. Make sure to use it often and you will be confused as a Puerto Rican in no time!

7. Janguiar/Janguear

Say the word janguear out loud, and you may be able to determine its definition: to hang out.

This is an example of an English words penetrating Puerto Rican Spanish.

Someone might say, “Voy a janguear con mis amigos en el parque esta noche.” This of course means, “I am going to hang out with my friends in the park tonight.”

8. Acho/Chacho

Puerto Rican boy

Acho and chacho are contractions of the Spanish word “muchacho” which means “boy”.

Just like most Spanish speaking countries, Puerto Ricans have a way of shortening words.

So, if you are trying to say, “What’s up, dude?” you can say “¿Que tal, acho?”

They are also used as fillers between thoughts and sentences when speaking. It’s similar to “well” in English.

9. A mí, plín

A mí, plín is a slightly vulgar way to say “I don’t care” or “no me importa”.

It is thought to have come from the English word “plink”, which means to shoot randomly and casually at targets.

Hopefully, by this point you aren't thinking, “A mí, plín” to these Puerto Rican Slang expressions.

10. Corillo

One Night Movie

Corillo is quite a useful word to know when talking to your new Puerto Rican friends.

The word “corillo” is the Puerto Rican slang for friends or a group of friends. You might hear someone say, “Vamos! Salgamos con el corillo!”

This signifies: “Let’s go! Let’s all leave together!”

Try out a few of these slang terms for Puerto Ricans and you are sure to make a “corillo” in no time.

I am sure most Puerto Ricans would feel honored that you are trying out the local slang expressions on them.

What’s Your Favorite Puerto Rican Slangs and Expressions?

Puerto Rican slangs

Ready to start speaking like a native Borinquen?

Puerto Rican slang is full of expressions and words found only in this beautiful island and many of which are influenced by English words and phrases.

The above list is only the tip of the iceberg and we tried to include only the 10 most important Puerto Rican slang expressions.

Puerto Rican Expressions

It can be useful whether you are planning a trip to Puerto Rico, have Puerto Rican friends or simply want to learn more about Puerto Rican slang and culture.

Using even a few native words or expressions can cause locals to instantly warm up to you even if your Spanish in general is not the best.

People will understand that you are interested in their culture and language and will welcome the opportunity to teach you more.

The ten words listed in this article are a place to start building your Puerto Rican vocabulary. Now get started and get using it!

Puerto Rican Slangs

Want an easy way to remember the slang words? Download the 1-Page Puerto Rican Slang Cheat Sheet.

DOWNLOAD CHEAT SHEET

Sours: https://spanishlandschool.com/puerto-rican-slangs/

La Borinqueña

¡Despierta, borinqueño
que han dado la señal!
¡Despierta de ese sueño
que es hora de luchar!
A ese llamar patriótico
¿no arde tu corazón?
¡Ven! Nos será simpático
el ruido del cañón.
Mira, ya el cubano
libre será;
le dará el machete
su libertad...
le dará el machete
su libertad.
Ya el tambor guerrero
dice en su son,
que es la manigua el sitio,
el sitio de la reunión,
de la reunión...
de la reunión.
El Grito de Lares
se ha de repetir,
y entonces sabremos
vencer o morir.
Bellísima Borinquén,
a Cuba hay que seguir;
tú tienes bravos hijos
que quieren combatir.
ya por más tiempo impávido
no podemos estar,
ya no queremos, tímidos
dejarnos subyugar.
Nosotros queremos
ser libre ya,
y nuestro machete
afilado está.
y nuestro machete
afilado está.
¿Por qué, entonces, nosotros
hemos de estar,
tan dormidos y sordos
y sordos a esa señal?
a esa señal, a esa señal?
No hay que temer, riqueños
al ruido del cañón,
que salvar a la patria
es deber del corazón!
ya no queremos déspotas,
caiga el tirano ya,
las mujeres indómitas
también sabrán luchar.
Nosotros queremos
la libertad,
y nuestros machetes
nos la darán...
y nuestro machete
nos la dará...
Vámonos, borinqueños,
vámonos ya,
que nos espera ansiosa,
ansiosa la libertad.
¡La libertad, la libertad!
Arise, boricua!
The call to arms has sounded!
Awake from the slumber,
it is time to fight!
Doesn't this patriotic
call set your heart alight?
Come! We are in tune with
the roar of the cannon.
Come, Come, the Cuban will
soon be freed;
the machete will give him
his justice,
the machete will give him
his liberty.
Now the drums of war
speak with their music,
that the jungle is the place,
the meeting place.
The meeting...
The meeting...
The Cry of Lares
must be repeated,
and then we will know:
victory or death.
Beautiful Borinquén
must follow Cuba;
you have brave sons
who wish to fight.
Now, no longer can
we be unmoved;
now we do not want timidly
to let them subjugate us.
We want to be free now,
and our machete
has been sharpened.
We want to be free now,
and our machete
has been sharpened.
Why, then,
have we been
so sleepy and deaf
to the call?
To the call, to the call?
There is no need to fear,
Ricans, the roar of the cannon;
saving the nation is
the duty of the heart.
We no longer want despots,
tyranny shall fall now;
the unconquerable women also will
know how to fight.
We want freedom,
and our machetes
will give it to us.
We want freedom,
and our machetes
will give it to us.
Come, Boricuas,
come now,
since freedom
awaits us anxiously,
freedom, freedom!
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Borinque%C3%B1a
  1. Spill stopper lid
  2. Dr jo stretches
  3. Crepe paper christmas decorations

La Boriqueña

La Borinqueña
Lyrics: Manuel Fernández Juncos (1846-1928)

La tierra de Borinquén
donde he nacido yo,
es un jardín florido
de mágico fulgor.

Un cielo siempre nítido
le sirve de dosel
y dan arrullos plácidos
las olas a sus pies.

Cuando a sus playas llegó Colón;
Exclamó lleno de admiración;
"Oh!, oh!, oh!, esta es la linda
tierra que busco yo".

Es Borinquén la hija,
la hija del mar y el sol,
del mar y el sol,
del mar y el sol,
del mar y el sol,
del mar y el sol.




The land of Borinquen
where I have been born.
It is a florid garden
of magical brilliance.

A sky always clean
serves as a canopy.
And placid lullabies are given
by the waves at her feet.

When at her beaches Columbus arrived,
he exclaimed full of admiration:
Oh! Oh! Oh!
This is the beautiful land, that I seek.

It is Borinquen the daughter,
the daughter of the sea and the sun.
of the sea and the sun,
of the sea and the sun,
of the sea and the sun,
of the sea and the sun!

Translation by Samuel Quiros


La Borinqueña (march)
Lyrics: Lola Rodríguez de Tió

Despierta, borinqueño
que han dado la señal!
Despierta de ese sueño
que es hora de luchar!

A ese llamar patriótico
no arde tu corazón?
Ven! Nos será simp´tico
el ruido del cañon.

Mira, ya el cubano
libre ser�;
le dar� el machete
su libertad...
le dar� el machete
su libertad.

Ya el tambor guerrero
dice en su son,
que es la manigua el sitio,
el sitio de la reuni�n,
de la reuni�n,
de la reuni�n.

El Grito de Lares
se ha de repetir,
y entonces sabremos
vencer o morir.

Bell�sima Borinquen,
a Cuba hay que seguir;
tu tienes bravos hijos
que quieren combatir.

ya por mas tiempo imp�vido
no podemos estar,
ya no queremos, t�midos
dejarnos subyugar.

Nosotros queremos
ser libre ya,
y nuestro machete
afilado esta..
y nuestro machete
afilado esta.

Por que entonces, nosotros
hemos de estar,
tan dormidos y sordos
y sordos a esa se�al?
a esa senil, a esa senil?

No hay que temer, riquenos
al ruido del canon,
que salvar a la patria
es deber del coraz�n!

ya no queremos d�spotas,
caiga el tirano ya,
las mujeres ind�mitas
tambi�n sabr�n luchar.

Nosotros queremos
la libertad,
y nuestros machetes
nos la dar�...
y nuestro machete
nos la dar�.

V�monos, borinque�os,
v�monos ya,
que nos espera ansiosa,
ansiosa la libertad.
La libertad, la libertad!

Arise, Puerto Rican!
the call to arms has sounded!
Awake from this dream,
it is time to fight!

Doesn't this patriotic call
set your heart alight?
Come! We are in tune
with the roar of the cannon.

Come, the Cuban
will soon be free;
the machete will give
him his liberty...
the machete will give
him his liberty.

Now the war drum
says with its sound,
that the jungle is the place
of the meeting,
of the meeting...
of the meeting.

The Cry of Lares
must be repeated,
and then we will know:
victory or death.

Beautiful Puerto Rico
must follow Cuba;
you have brave sons
who wish to fight.

Now, no longer can we be unmoved;
now we do not want timidly
to let them subjugate us.
 

We want
to be free now,
and our machete
has been sharpened...
and our machete
has been sharpened.

Why then have we been
so sleepy and deaf
and deaf to the call?

 

There is no need to fear, Puerto Ricans,
the roar of the cannon;
saving the nation
is the duty of the heart.

We no longer want despots,
tyranny shall fall now;
the unconquerable women
also will know how to fight.

We want
liberty,
and our machetes
will give it to us...
and our machete
will give it to us.

Come, Puerto Ricans,
come now,
since freedom awaits us anxiously,
anxiously freedom.
freedom! freedom!


La Bella Trigueña (danza)
Lyrics: Félix Astol Artés (1813-1901)
(lyrics also attributed to Francisco Ramírez)

Bellísima trigueña
imagen del candor
del jardín de Borinquen
pura y fragante flor.

Por ti se queda extático
todo el mortal que ve
tu aire gentil, simpático
tu breve y lindo pie.

Cuando te asomas a tu balcón
la luz se eclipsa del mismo sol
la luz se eclipsa del mismo sol

Porque tus negros ojos
dos rayos son,
que al que los mira, niña
abrásanle el corazón

Tú galana descuellas
entre las flores mil
que adornan primorosas
el tropical pensil.

En torno a ti
el céfiro se mueve sin cesar,
el colibrí solícito
te viene a acariciar.

Linda trigueña mi dulce bien,
eres la perla de Borinquen
�Oh!, Oh!, �Oh!
Apiádate, tierra de mi dolor,
que por ti me muero
me muero de inmenso amor
de inmenso amor, de inmenso amor



Sours: https://welcome.topuertorico.org/bori.shtml
Enganchados Sonora Borinquen (2019)

Lamento Borincano

1929 song performed by Rafael Hernández Marín

1929 single by Rafael Hernández Marín

"Lamento Borincano" (English: Puerto Rican Melancholy) is Rafael Hernández Marín's acclaimed composition in Puerto Rico's patriotic tradition. It takes its name from the free musical form Lament (Latin, lāmentor), and from Borinquen, an indigenous name for the island. Hernández released the song in 1929 to illustrate the economic precariousness that had engulfed the Puerto Rican farmer since the late 1920s' Puerto Rico. It became an instantaneous hit in Puerto Rico and its popularity soon followed in may countries of Latin America. Renown international artists have sung it and featured it in their repertoire.[2][3]

Monument to the "Lamento Borincano," in el Viejo San Juan

In 2018, the original 1930 recording of the song by Canario y Su Grupo was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or artistically significant."[4]

History[edit]

Hernandez composed the song while he lived in New York City, in Spanish Harlem. That same year, he also wrote his masterpiece, "Preciosa". In 1947, Hernández returned to Puerto Rico to become an orchestra director at the government-owned WIPR Radio.[5][6]Lamento Borincano was interpreted by dozens of artists and became an important part of Puerto Rican culture.[7]

In 1929, 17-year-old Davilita met Rafael Hernández by chance. Davilita got along quite well with Hernández Marín and was able to see the unfinished version of Hernandez's "Lamento Borincano". Davilita asked Hernandez if he could record the song but, Hernandez thought that Davilita was too young and declined his request. The song was to be recorded by bandleader Manuel "Canario" Jiménez and his band. A musician named Ramon Quiroz became ill on the day of the recording, so Davilita ended up as lead vocals, with Fausto Delgado on backup.[8]

Theme[edit]

The song reflects the economic situation of the poor farmers in the Puerto Rico of the 1920s decade leading to the Great Depression. The song starts with a cheerful and optimistic tone, presenting the jíbarito. The jíbarito (diminutive of Jíbaro) is a self-subsistence farmer and descendants of the intermixing of Taíno and Spaniards during the XVI century, who is the iconic reflection of the Puerto Rican people of the day. The jíbarito was a farmer-salesman who would also grow enough crops to sell in the town in order to purchase clothing, etc., for his family. The song speaks of the jíbarito walking with his donkey loaded with fruits and vegetables from his plot of land and heading to town to sell his load but, disappointed to see the poverty prevalent even in town and unable to sell his load, the jíbarito returns home with his load unsold. The song thus ends with a sad, melancholic tone. The song does not name Puerto Rico by its modern name, instead uses its former pre-Columbian name "Borinquen".[9]

Chorus[edit]

The chorus reads,
Borinquen! La tierra del Edén
la que al cantar, el gran Gautier
llamo la perla de los mares
ahora que tú te mueres con tus pesares
déjame que te cante yo también
(English: Borinquen! The land of the Eden/The one when he sang, the great Gautier/Called the Pearl of the Seas/Now that you lay dying from your sorrows/Let me sing to you, me as well.)
however, though Rafael Hernández names the Puerto Rican poet José Gautier Benítez, some artists who have recorded the song replace his name with the word "Gotier" in place of Gautier.

Recordings[edit]

External audio
audio icon You may listen to Luciano Quiñones piano interpretation of Hernandez' "Lamento Borincano"here

Following is a partial listing of recordings of the song by different artists.

  • Marco Antonio Muñiz. Los Grandes Exitos de Marco Antonio Muñiz (RCA International, 1983)
  • Gilberto Monroig. Grandes Compositores, Rafael Hernandez: Volumen 3 (Polygram Records, 1994)
  • Javier Solís. Personalidad: 20 Exitos (Sony Discos, 2002)
  • Alfonso Ortiz Tirado. Original version of the song that became an immediate hit
  • Paco de Lucía (duet with Ramón de Algeciras). En Hispanoamérica
  • Chavela Vargas
  • Franck Pourcel. Instrumental
  • Banda Los Escamilla. Album: La Consentida (2004)
  • Conjunto Primavera
  • Caetano Veloso
  • Ginamaria Hidalgo
  • Chelito de Castro (with Juan Carlos Coronel)
  • Alfredo Kraus
  • Plácido Domingo
  • Óscar Chávez
  • Pedro Infante
  • Roberto Torres
  • Toña la Negra
  • Víctor Jara (Canto libre, 1970)
  • Daniel Santos
  • Estela Raval y Los 5 Latinos
  • Radio Pirata Version Rock
  • Marc Anthony (Valió la Pena, 2004)
  • Los Indios Tabajaras Instrumental
  • Leo Marini
  • Facundo Cabral
  • Pedro Vargas
  • La Lupe (with Tito Puente)
  • Los Panchos
  • José Feliciano (with Luis Fonsi) (José Feliciano y Amigos, 2006)
  • Enrique Cardenas Instrumental
  • Marc Anthony, Ednita Nazario, Gilberto Santa Rosa and Ruth Fernández in the Banco Popular de Puerto Rico special, "Romance del Cumbanchero".
  • Edith Márquez
  • Ainhoa Arteta
  • Cuco Sánchez
  • Carlo Buti
  • Luciano Tajoli
  • William Cepeda Version Bomba
  • Las Acevedo, a Tribute to Chavela Vargas La Chamana.
  • Trio Los Andinos with Carmin Vega in "Los Andinos: Homenaje a Rafael Hernandez, con Carmin Vega". (2003, Disco Hit Productions)

References[edit]

  1. ^Cumple 60 ‘En mi Viejo San Juan’. Miguel López Ortiz. Fundación Nacional para la Cultura Popular. 25 August 2006.
  2. ^Rodriguez, Arnaldo (May 9, 2000). "En Nueva York 'El Cofresi' de Rafael Hernandez". Impacto.
  3. ^Galán, Tacho (2014). "Lamento Borincano". In Stavan, Lian (ed.). Latin Music : Musicians. Genres, and Themes. 1–2. Westport. CT. USA: Greenwood, 2014. p. 390.
  4. ^"National Recording Registry Reaches 500". Library of Congress. March 21, 2018. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
  5. ^Hernandez Marin, Rafael
  6. ^Rafael Hernández Marín.Archived 2014-02-22 at the Wayback Machine Encyclopedia Puerto Rico. 6 February 2014.
  7. ^"History of Puerto Rico.". Archived from the original on 2014-05-15. Retrieved 2014-02-06.
  8. ^music of Puerto Rico
  9. ^Preciosa: The People, History, and Music of Puerto Rico. Mark U. Reimer. Christopher Newport University. Proceedings of the May 2010 Conference of the Global Awareness Society International in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Page 11. May 2010. Retrieved 7 February 2014.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamento_Borincano

Significado borinquen

.

PALO! \

.

You will also be interested:

.



553 554 555 556 557